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    • The Happiness and the Highly Sensitive Person teleconference series is specially designed to help individuals high in sensory processing be more themselves, happier and more productive. You can become a more authentic HSP.

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    • HSP coaching helps you create an action plan, providing the tools, perspective and support to reach higher than you could on your own. It also offers the understanding and support that your current environment may not.

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    • This FREE monthly class is an introduction to goal-setting for the highly sensitive person. Learn why traditional goal-setting techniques may not have worked for you, and balance life's areas to keep your "wheel of life" turning smoothly.

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    • Let's talk about your life experiences, your goals as an HSP, and how Authenticity Coaching could help you reach them. Schedule a free, no-obligation phone conversation with instructor-coach Celeste O'Brien today.

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    • HSPs & the orchid-dandelion hypothesis

      The highly sensitive child, if raised in a positive atmosphere, grows into an adult who, according to researcher Dr. Elaine Aron, may be "happier, healthier, and more socially skilled" than one who is not highly sensitive. They are like orchids in that they can flourish when given good care. In this article: some, not all, orchid children are HSPs. Put sensitivity into perspective. Find an important tip for parenting the orchid child. The orchid-dandelion hypothesis is very good news for the [...]

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      Authenticity for the HSP

      For the highly sensitive person, authenticity is a key piece of success and life satisfaction, combining your strengths and values. When you lack that alignment, some of your energy is drained off by the extra effort needed to keep moving forward. The question to ask: what makes your heart sing? In this article you’ll find more about why authenticity is so important for everyone, especially to the HSP, and how authentic goals mean better results. We'll talk about how using your strengths is[...]

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    • Ten misconceptions about happiness

      The highly sensitive person (HSP) thrives in a supportive atmosphere. We can learn a lot about creating that atmosphere from positive psychology. With its focus on happiness and the factors that help individuals and communities thrive, it is a good fit for the HSP. Instead of endlessly trying to fix what we don't like about ourselves, the research is clear that we can use our innate strengths and core abilities to "crowd out" the negative. So you too can become a more effective, confidant, and [...]

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      Negativity bias or survival bias? Is the bad stronger than the good?

      The highly sensitive person is typically compassionate and conscientious. Must they accept that the bad really is stronger than the good? Some scientists have put forth the idea that humans have a negativity bias. But, is it possible that what we have is actually a survival bias? That we pay attention on a priority basis to those essential issues so that lesser concerns can have meaning? The present thinking seems to be that the bad is stronger than the good: “Over and over,” [...]

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    • Teleconference class schedule

      Mar

      01

      Pillars of a Balanced Life

      This free introduction to goal-setting for the highly sensitive person includes three weeks via email beginning Wednesday, March 1, 2017 and continuing on March 8th and 15th. The fourth and final week we will meet via live teleconference on Wednesday, March 22nd from 7 – 8pm ET.

      See all events on our class calendar

    • Twelve tips for the manager of highly sensitive people

      Are you the manager of highly sensitive people? Probably--HSPs are twenty percent of the population. The HSP tends to more fully consider options and outcomes and so may be a major asset to your department. You may think of a sensitive person as an immature, self-absorbed and temperamental individual who flies off the handle at every small thing. Not so, according to science. Being “highly sensitive” means being high in sensory processing sensitivity (SPS), a trait that is [...]

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